See something you'd like to change or add, but you've never edited an open encyclopædia before? This overview was written to help absolute beginners get started.

aSK:Article problems

From A Storehouse of Knowledge
Jump to: navigation, search

If you followed a link in an article to here, it's because someone thought that there was a problem with the article that need attention.

These links are sometimes known as tags.

Several different tags lead here, as listed below.

Contents

Fact?

A [Fact?] tag in an article indicates that the person who put it there believes that the claim is probably incorrect, and wants someone to verify it if they can. The onus is on the person who original inserted the claim to back it up, although of course anybody is able to do this.

The normal solution would be to insert a suitable reference showing that the claim is correct.

Alternatively, if another editor knows that the information is incorrect, he can remove the claim. Or, if the Fact? tag has been there for a while with no evidence offered in support of the claim, the claim should be removed.

Check this

A [Check this] tag in an article indicates that the person who put it there believes that the claim is probably (more likely than not) correct, but would like it verified. The onus is on the person who originally inserted the claim to back it up, although of course anybody is able to do this.

The normal solution would be to insert a suitable reference showing that the claim is correct.

If no support is forthcoming, the claim is best removed, although this should not be done as hastily as in the case of the [Fact?] tag.

Alternatively, someone else might have greater doubts and change it to a [Fact?] tag.

Cite requested

A "Cite requested" tag in an article indicates that the person who put it there either knows that the claim is correct or thinks that it is very probably correct, but that it still should have a reference. In some cases, the editor who put the claim in might add this tag himself, hoping that someone else will have a reference handy or be able to track one down.

If no reference is forthcoming, the claim should stay, unless of course someone else decides to change the tag to something else.

Who?

A [Who?] tag in an article indicates that the person who put it there believes that the article should be more specific about who makes a claim or believes something. Just saying "Some people believe...", for example, is usually too vague.

The tag might also indicate that the person who put it there is questioning whether anybody does really do what the article says.

The solution is to me more specific about who is being referred to, preferably with a reference to support it.

Personal tools

Variants
Actions
visitor navigation
contributor navigation
monitoring
Toolbox